Ads Campaigns

In this page, we will cover the following about ads campaigns:

  • Planning account structure
  • Common ways to structure campaigns
  • Deciding where to show your ads
  • Device targeting options
  • Choosing which locations to target
  • Excluding locations from seeing your ads
  • Selecting target languages
  • Creating themed ad groups
  • Renaming campaigns and ad groups

Introduction

Account structure is the fundamental basis of being able to write relevant ads, track and optimize your campaigns, and keep your budget manageable. Poor account structure is one of the most common reasons why advertisers fail, and it can make or break the success of your account. Taking some time to properly plan out your campaigns can save you time and money down the road.

Planning account structure

Proper account structure will help you lay a solid foundation for your ad campaigns and will simplify account management and reporting. Although there are many different ways to structure an account, there are some best practices that have proven to work. Your account structure will depend on your unique business and your goals, and it will likely change over time as you optimize.

Getting ready

Before you start adding in keywords and ads you’d like to advertise on, think about the following:

  • What products or services would you like to advertise?
  • Are some of your product lines or services of greater priority?
  • Where are your potential customers? What locations and regions would you like to target?
  • Do you have different budgets for your various products and services?

How to do it…

An advertiser typically has one Google Ads account with multiple campaigns. Each campaign should have themed ad groups to further group keywords, placements, and other targets. In addition to keywords and other targets, an ad group also contains ads that should reflect each ad group’s theme.

As you plan your structure, keep in mind the following best practices:

  • Organize your campaigns by themes. Create separate campaigns for different products or services to take advantage of settings that you choose at the campaign level. For example, as a retailer, you might want to create separate campaigns for the different types of products you sell.
  • Split up your campaigns by Search and Display. Create separate campaigns for the different networks, as they require different strategies.
  • Organize by spend. Create unique campaigns for sets of products that have separate budgets. This will allow you to allocate and control ad spend for each category.
  • An Google Ads account has a limit of 5 million targeting items per account, which could include targets such as keywords or placements.

The following are some example campaigns a website that sells furniture might want to start with:

How it works…

You are not forever locked into the account structure that you choose when you first set up your account. You can continue to restructure and refine your campaigns as you go and test. The campaigns you’ll develop over time will likely be structured differently than what you start out with.

There’s more…

I recommend most advertisers start their initial campaigns by advertising on search only, and to avoid display at first, while you learn more about Google Ads and what will work for your business. Once you have a solid understanding of the interface and the various options, I recommend testing display with a smaller budget via a campaign separate from your search campaigns. This way display ads do not dominate your overall spend.

The Common ways to structure campaigns recipe The Creating themed ad groups recipe

Common ways to structure campaigns

There is no one right or wrong way to structure an account. Each business is unique with different advertising goals, budgets, and priorities. An account structure that works for one advertiser may not work for another. Ultimately, proper account structure with intuitively labeled campaigns will simplify account management and analysis, and will help you to properly test and optimize.

Getting ready

Review your website’s sitemap to determine if you can re-use it for Google Ads. Many advertisers choose to structure their campaigns according to their website’s layout. You have probably structured your website carefully by topics or product, and you’ll have landing pages to reflect these categories that you can use for your campaigns and ad groups.

Decide if you’d like to advertise on search, display, or on both networks.

How to do it…

The following are some common ways and best practices to structure your campaigns:

By network: Always keep search and display networks separate. Create different campaigns for search and display strategies so you can customize settings and use different budgets.

  • Halloween costumes – Search
  • Halloween costumes – Display

By location: If your business operates in different locations, you might want to consider creating different campaigns targeting these locations so you can better customize keywords and ads for each region. For example, if you sell Halloween costumes in the United States and the United Kingdom, you could create separate campaigns for each country, customizing ads within each campaign with country specific offers, such as shipping.

  • Halloween costumes – US
  • Halloween costumes – UK

By types of products or services: You can create separate campaigns for sets of products or similar services. For example, if you sell shoes, you can create the following campaigns:

  • Women’s shoes
  • Kid’s shoes
  • Men’s shoes

By brand: Many businesses, especially retailers and e-commerce websites, sell a variety of brands that can each have their own campaigns.

  • Samsung
  • Apple
  • Nokia

By priority or ROI: If some of your products or services are higher priority than others you may wish to keep them in their own campaigns. This will allow you to use a higher budget for that strategic set of keywords. For example, you can have two campaigns:

High priority keywords with a bigger chunk of your budget Low priority keywords with a smaller budget

By language: If your target audience speaks multiple languages, you can choose to segment campaigns by language. For example:

  • Kid’s shoes – English
  • Kid’s shoes – Spanish

Name your campaigns to reflect the keywords and settings you are choosing, so you can easily analyze the data. You can rename your campaigns and ad groups at any time. However, if you rename a campaign in Google Ads, it will be tracked as a brand new campaign in your Google Analytics reports.

How it works…

Keeping campaigns separate is important because you can allocate different budgets for each campaign. It also helps you better analyze returns, prioritize ad budgets and spending on what’s working, and act based on changes to business inventory, priorities, or customer demand.

For example, if you had separate campaigns for two different brands of shoes, you could turn off the brand that is currently out of stock and increase the budget on a brand that came out with a popular new model.

If you simply lumped all of your keywords into one campaign, the highest search volume keywords which may not even be converting for you might end up dominating your spend and might prevent your important keywords from showing up.

There’s more…

You will likely start with a more simple account structure that will develop and change as you learn what works for you. You can always move keywords and ads from one campaign to another and split up one campaign into multiple campaigns to a more precise target. If you choose to re-organize your campaigns, your new campaigns will start out with fresh statistics, but you will be able to access past reports and data at any time.

Deciding where to show your ads

As you are setting up your Google Ads campaigns, you have the option to choose your targeting preferences more broadly to maximize your ad reach, or to restrict targeting to ensure ads are only showing to your very specific audience. Who will end up seeing your ads will depend on the campaign settings you choose as you create your campaigns.

Getting ready

The first setting you’ll need to consider when creating your campaigns will be which networks you’d like to show ads on. Google has two main networks through which ads are served:

Search network

Includes Google.com, Google properties such as Google Maps, and search partners, such as AOL.com.

Ads are text based.

Display network

Includes Gmail, YouTube, and millions of partner websites, such as nytimes.com, where your potential customers could be reading the news or articles related to your products.

Ad formats include: text, image, video, and rich media.

How to do it…

If you are new to Google Ads, I recommend you start with a search only campaign while you learn the platform. If you’d still like to test display from the start, I recommend keeping it separate from your search campaign:

  • Click on the Campaigns tab and click on the prompt to create a new campaign.
  • Choose either Search Network only or Display Network only. I do not recommend choosing Search & Display Networks from within one campaign.
  • If you’d like to target both search and display, create two separate campaigns, choosing one network within each campaign.
  • If you already have an Google Ads campaign running, you can check which networks you have opted to show on in your campaign Settings page under the Networks section:

How it works…

On the Search Network only option, Google Ads ads are served based on a user’s search query. Users search for specific information and do so via keywords they type in to a search box. The ads that are shown are driven by search queries, hence Search Network only.

On the Display Network only option, Google Ads ads can be served based on the websites’ content or user interests. Users browse online information, such as news articles, and Google Ads ads appear alongside this content, which the Google Ads system deems relevant based on the keywords and themes you have chosen for your campaign. Advertiser can also choose to target specific websites that they know are browsed by their target audience.

There’s more…

Users who are seeing your ads via the Google Search network or through the Display network will tend to be in very different phases of the buying or decision cycle, and you should consider this as you plan out your advertising strategies.

The Google Search network will generally bring you visitors who are more ready to purchase, and they are searching for specific products and services.

On the Google Display network, users are browsing online for content and may not be looking for your product or service at that moment. They are often not as likely to convert as visitors who find you via search ads.

However, through Display, you can show your ads to users who are browsing websites that are highly targeted to what you are offering or websites that are specific to your target demographic. The Display network is a great way to boost traffic and reach those who may not be even aware that they need your products.

For example, a country club in California looking to sell golf club memberships can show an image ad with a beautiful golf course to a user who is reading an article about the latest golf clubs.

For most businesses, the Search network will convert a bit better than the Display network. However, this is not the case for all advertisers. In fact, for some, Display outperforms Search, especially because the former has become quite saturated and competitive for many industries. I recommend you test both networks to find how your audience responds.

Device targeting options

Your customers are increasingly searching for you not just from their computers, but from high-end mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets. This rapid growth of mobile necessitates custom strategies for the different ways users behave, depending on what device they use. For example, people searching from their computer desks tend to use longer search phrases than those searching on their smartphones. While you cannot opt out of tablet devices, you can adjust mobile bids through each campaign and ad group. Savvy marketers track ROI from each device and create tailored strategies to maximize the potential of each user base.

Getting ready

By default, each campaign is designed to be displayed on all devices. However, before you spend money advertising on mobile phones, make sure that your website is mobile friendly. Many advertisers invest in creating a mobile friendly version of their website, optimized for the mobile browsing experience. Many visitors will not be willing to fill out a long contact form or complete a transaction on their smartphones, so make sure you take that into consideration.

To check out what your website looks like on a mobile device and to make it more mobile friendly, go to http://www.howtogomo.com.

How to do it…

To choose and modify mobile device targeting, perform the following steps:

  • If your website loads properly on smartphones, target all devices to start with and then adjust mobile bids based on performance.
  • Your default device targeting is preset so ads are shown on all devices as you create your campaign:
  • After you create your campaign, you can adjust mobile bids in your campaign’s Settings page. To opt out of mobile completely, use a -100% bid adjustment:
  • Mobile bids are adjusted at the campaign or at the ad group level, and you’ll need to repeat this process for each of your campaigns.
  • Your device settings page does not provide the option to opt out of computers or tablets. However, you can set very low default ad group bids (for example, $0.01) and use aggressive mobile bid adjustments (for example, increase by 500 percent) to virtually opt a campaign out of computers and tablets and run mostly on mobile. You may still get some traffic from computers and tablets, but with very low default bids, such clicks should be minimal.

How it works…

To help you better segment how your customers are finding you, Google Ads offers the following device targeting options.

  • Desktop and laptop computers
  • Mobile devices with full browsers
  • Tablets with full browsers

Advertisers cannot opt campaigns out of computers or tablets, but you can adjust this by increasing or decreasing mobile bids.

You can see each campaign’s traffic segmented by device in your Google Ads Campaign Management page. Simply click on Segment and choose Device to see device-specific performance breakdowns by campaign.

Choosing which locations to target

Precise location targeting is one of the biggest selling points of Google Ads, offering advertisers the flexibility to reach their customers wherever they might be and to customize messaging based on location. You can target as broadly as worldwide, or get as granular as targeting a specific city or a predefined radius.

Your ads will appear to people you are targeting, avoiding irrelevant clicks and helping you to zero in on the most targeted audience, but please note that location targeting may not always be 100 percent accurate.

Getting ready

Think about where your target customers are located and who you’d like to see your ads. Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Do you ship products internationally or work with customers outside of your country?
  • If you are a local business, how far of a radius are your customers willing to travel from, or how far are you willing to travel to reach your customers?
  • Are there specific metro areas or cities that you would like to focus on?
  • Do you have multiple business locations that will require customized messaging?

How to do it…

You will choose your location targeting preferences as you set up each campaign. You can also edit any location preferences you may have set up already:

  • Navigate from the campaign setting page to the Locations section.
  • If you are a business that services worldwide clients, choose All countries and territories:
  • If your target audience is in a specific country, state, or metro area, type in your search into the Let me choose… box to narrow down your focus. Google Ads will start to populate related available targets based on what you are typing in.

Click on Add to add a specific location option from your search.

  • Click on Nearby if you’d like to see other options that are close to your search. A new box will pop up with additional nearby options that you can choose to target.
  • To target around a radius, type into the search box your zip code, then click on Nearby. Another screen will pop up that will allow you to choose a range in miles around a specific radius. Click to add your chosen location, pick the number of miles to target around, and save your selection.

How it works…

Google Ads figures out a user’s location and serves ads based on one of following factors:

  • Physical location (IP address): Google Ads determines someone’s physical location based on their computer location, which is determined via an Internet protocol (IP) address. An IP address is a unique number assigned by Internet service providers (ISP) to each computer. Please note that some ISPs mask their users’ IP addresses, so IP address targeting is not 100 percent accurate.
  • Search intent: Google Ads serves ads based on interest in geographic areas indicated through searches. A user may indicate interest in a specific location via a search query, even though that user could be located outside the target location. For example, Mary from San Francisco is looking for a spa in New York. Even though Mary is physically located in San Francisco, Google Ads recognizes that she is interested in a spa outside of her current physical location, because of her spa in new york search query, and an Google Ads ad targeting the New York area pops up.
  • Google domain: Each country has a unique URL that helps Google determine where a user is located. For example, someone searching Google from France might be on google.fr.
  • Mobile device location: If a user is searching from a high-end mobile device, Google Ads may be able to detect device location and serve relevant ads.

Excluding locations from seeing your ads

Google Ads offers the ability to restrict whom your ads are shown to and exclude locations you do not do business with, or cities and zip codes that are not profitable for you. By showing ads only to locations you are interested in working with, you can improve your results and ROI.

Getting ready

The following is a list of who will benefit from excluding locations:

  • Business that do not ship to certain states or regions
  • Businesses that want to avoid working in specific cities or zip codes Companies that may not be licensed to operate in all states

How to do it…

To exclude locations within individual campaigns, perform the following steps:

  • Go to the Campaigns tab, click on the campaign you’d like to edit, and choose Settings.
  • Choose the Locations sub-tab and click on Edit locations.
  • Type the location you’d like to exclude in the search box and click on Exclude:

4.   Save your selection.

How it works…

Location exclusion ensures that your ads are not shown to people in cities or regions you select. You can exclude a specific zip code, city, metro area, state, or entire country. Once you add a location to exclude, Google Ads will not serve your ads within that region.

Selecting target languages

Google Ads lets you choose the languages of the websites that your ads appear on. You can choose to target specific languages or all available languages for greatest reach.

Getting ready

To determine if you should target multiple languages, consider the following:

What languages do your customers speak or what languages are spoken in the areas you’ll target?

Is your website available in multiple languages?

Is your business, such as your customer support and sales teams, equipped to handle inquiries from multiple languages?

How to do it…

To edit your campaign language preferences:

  • Go to the Campaigns tab, click on the campaign you’d like to edit, and choose Settings. You should be in the All settings sub-tab.
  • Scroll down to Languages and click on Edit.
  • Choose applicable languages and click on Save:

How it works…

Google Ads decides where to show ads based on one of the following:

  • Google language setting. Each Google domain has a default (for example, Google.it defaults to Italian), but you can change your language settings via
http://www.google.com/preferences.
  • Language of a user’s search query, or in what language is the user searching on Google.
  • The language of the currently viewed page or recently viewed pages on Google’s Display network. For example, if a person is reading news in Italian, Google Ads will show ads targeted to Italian speakers.

There’s more…

Language targeting is chosen at the campaign level. You may wish to create separate campaigns for different language targets, especially if you are considering using keywords in different languages and have a website that’s translated into multiple languages. For example, you may wish to have the following campaigns:

  • Campaign #1 – English
  • Campaign #2 – Spanish

The Choosing which locations to target recipe

Creating themed ad groups

An ad group should contain closely related keywords that all speak to a similar theme. Keeping all keywords within a single, tightly themed ad group will allow you to create more targeted ads that will generate a better response, bring more qualified visitors, and improve returns.

Getting ready

To help you get ready, following are some examples of ad groups that follow best practices as well as ad groups that do not.

Poor ad group structure

If an ad group has several keywords, all with different themes, your ads are less likely to be effectively targeted. The following is an example of a poorly themed ad group with only keywords within that ad group loosely related:

Ad Group:

  • Cleaning Service

Keywords:

  • Sofa cleaning
  • Carpet cleaning service
  • Stains
  • Drapery cleaning

A good test to double check if your themes are tight enough is to ask yourself if each keyword within your ad group has been reflected in your ad text. Make sure you find a balance between relevant groupings and being too specific. Creating a separate ad group for each individual keyword is likely not the best use of your time!How to do it…

To create a new ad group within an Google Ads campaign, perform the following steps:

  • Go to the Campaigns tab, and click on the campaign you’d like to create ad groups for.
  • Click on + New ad group.
  • Name your ad group. Choose a name descriptive of the keywords that you will be adding to this ad group.
  • Write a text ad. Your ads should point out what makes your business unique and include some of your keywords, ideally in your headline:
  • Enter your keywords. Start with small, targeted lists of 5 to 10 keywords.
  • Choose a default bid that will apply to this ad group. Refer to Chapter 1, Researching the Market and Competition and Setting Goals, and research competitors to getbid ideas.
  • Click on Save ad group:

How it works…

An ad group is a set of similar keywords and ads with a default bid. Within each campaign, you can have multiple ad groups. Each campaign can house up to 20,000 ad groups.

There’s more…

The following are some common themes to create ad groups around:

  • Different products or services (such as carpet cleaning and furniture cleaning)
  • Different ways to describe the same product or service (such as carpet cleaning and rug cleaning)
  • Multiple locations (such as San Jose carpet cleaning and Santa Clara carpet cleaning)
  • Separate ad groups for each landing page, product, or service
  • Separate ad groups for special offers or holiday promotions

Renaming campaigns and ad groups

After you set up your campaigns and ad groups, you may wish to rename them to better reflect the theme or promotion you are running. You can rename Google Ads campaigns and ad groups at any time.

Getting ready

Plan out your new naming convention. It’s usually helpful to describe the campaign’s theme as well as the network you are targeting.

How to do it…

  • Click on the Campaigns tab, hover next to the campaign or ad group you wish to rename until you see a pencil icon, then click on it.
  • Enter the new name and click on Save:

There’s more…

You may wish to name your campaigns to reflect the products and services you are promoting, which regions they target, or to indicate what networks you are running ads on. For example, you could have a campaign named Printing Supplies – Search – USA. If you decide to rename a campaign, keep in mind that it will start showing as a new campaign in your Google Analytics reports, so try to avoid frequently changing campaign names.

Device targeting options

Your customers are increasingly searching for you not just from their computers, but from high-end mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets. This rapid growth of mobile necessitates custom strategies for the different ways users behave, depending on what device they use. For example, people searching from their computer desks tend to use longer search phrases than those searching on their smartphones. While you cannot opt out of tablet devices, you can adjust mobile bids through each campaign and ad group. Savvy marketers track ROI from each device and create tailored strategies to maximize the potential of each user base.

Getting ready

By default, each campaign is designed to be displayed on all devices. However, before you spend money advertising on mobile phones, make sure that your website is mobile friendly. Many advertisers invest in creating a mobile friendly version of their website, optimized for the mobile browsing experience. Many visitors will not be willing to fill out a long contact form or complete a transaction on their smartphones, so make sure you take that into consideration.

To check out what your website looks like on a mobile device and to make it more mobile friendly, go to http://www.howtogomo.com

How to do it…

To choose and modify mobile device targeting, perform the following steps:

  • If your website loads properly on smartphones, target all devices to start with and then adjust mobile bids based on performance.
  • Your default device targeting is preset so ads are shown on all devices as you create your campaign:
  • After you create your campaign, you can adjust mobile bids in your campaign’s Settings page. To opt out of mobile completely, use a -100% bid adjustment:
  • Mobile bids are adjusted at the campaign or at the ad group level, and you’ll need to repeat this process for each of your campaigns.
  • Your device settings page does not provide the option to opt out of computers or tablets. However, you can set very low default ad group bids (for example, $0.01) and use aggressive mobile bid adjustments (for example, increase by 500 percent) to virtually opt a campaign out of computers and tablets and run mostly on mobile. You may still get some traffic from computers and tablets, but with very low default bids, such clicks should be minimal.

How it works…

To help you better segment how your customers are finding you, Google Ads offers the following device targeting options:

  • Desktop and laptop computers
  • Mobile devices with full browsers
  • Tablets with full browsers

Advertisers cannot opt campaigns out of computers or tablets, but you can adjust this by increasing or decreasing mobile bids.

You can see each campaign’s traffic segmented by device in your Google Ads Campaign Management page. Simply click on Segment and choose Device to see device-specific performance breakdowns by campaign:

Choosing which locations to target

Precise location targeting is one of the biggest selling points of Google Ads, offering advertisers the flexibility to reach their customers wherever they might be and to customize messaging based on location. You can target as broadly as worldwide, or get as granular as targeting a specific city or a predefined radius.

Your ads will appear to people you are targeting, avoiding irrelevant clicks and helping you to zero in on the most targeted audience, but please note that location targeting may not always be 100 percent accurate.

Getting ready

Think about where your target customers are located and who you’d like to see your ads. Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Do you ship products internationally or work with customers outside of your country?
  • If you are a local business, how far of a radius are your customers willing to travel from, or how far are you willing to travel to reach your customers?
  • Are there specific metro areas or cities that you would like to focus on?
  • Do you have multiple business locations that will require customized messaging?

How to do it…

You will choose your location targeting preferences as you set up each campaign. You can also edit any location preferences you may have set up already:

  • Navigate from the campaign setting page to the Locations section.
  • If you are a business that services worldwide clients, choose All countries and territories.
  • If your target audience is in a specific country, state, or metro area, type in your search into the Let me choose… box to narrow down your focus. Google Ads will start to populate related available targets based on what you are typing in.
  • Click on Add to add a specific location option from your search.
  • Click on Nearby if you’d like to see other options that are close to your search. A new box will pop up with additional nearby options that you can choose to target.
  • To target around a radius, type into the search box your zip code, then click on Nearby. Another screen will pop up that will allow you to choose a range in miles around a specific radius. Click to add your chosen location, pick the number of miles to target around, and save your selection:

How it works…

Google Ads figures out a user’s location and serves ads based on one of following factors:

  • Physical location (IP address): Google Ads determines someone’s physical location based on their computer location, which is determined via an Internet protocol (IP) address. An IP address is a unique number assigned by Internet service providers (ISP) to each computer. Please note that some ISPs mask their users’ IP addresses, so IP address targeting is not 100 percent accurate.
  • Search intent: Google Ads serves ads based on interest in geographic areas indicated through searches. A user may indicate interest in a specific location via a search query, even though that user could be located outside the target location. For example, Mary from San Francisco is looking for a spa in New York. Even though Mary is physically located in San Francisco, Google Ads recognizes that she is interested in

a spa outside of her current physical location, because of her spa in new york search query, and an Google Ads ad targeting the New York area pops up.

  • Google domain: Each country has a unique URL that helps Google determine where a user is located. For example, someone searching Google from France might be on google.fr.
  • Mobile device location: If a user is searching from a high-end mobile device, Google Ads may be able to detect device location and serve relevant ads.
  • The Excluding locations from seeing your ads recipe

Excluding locations from seeing your ads

Google Ads offers the ability to restrict whom your ads are shown to and exclude locations you do not do business with, or cities and zip codes that are not profitable for you. By showing ads only to locations you are interested in working with, you can improve your results and ROI.

Getting ready

The following is a list of who will benefit from excluding locations:

  • Business that do not ship to certain states or regions
  • Businesses that want to avoid working in specific cities or zip codes Companies that may not be licensed to operate in all statesHow to do it…

To exclude locations within individual campaigns, perform the following steps:

  • Go to the Campaigns tab, click on the campaign you’d like to edit, and choose Settings.
  • Choose the Locations sub-tab and click on Edit locations.
  • Type the location you’d like to exclude in the search box and click on Exclude:
  • Save your selection.

How it works…

Location exclusion ensures that your ads are not shown to people in cities or regions you select. You can exclude a specific zip code, city, metro area, state, or entire country. Once you add a location to exclude, Google Ads will not serve your ads within that region.

The Choosing which locations to target

Selecting target languages

Google Ads lets you choose the languages of the websites that your ads appear on. You can choose to target specific languages or all available languages for greatest reach.

Getting ready

To determine if you should target multiple languages, consider the following:

  • What languages do your customers speak or what languages are spoken in the areas you’ll target?
  • Is your website available in multiple languages?
  • Is your business, such as your customer support and sales teams, equipped to handle inquiries from multiple languages?

How to do it…

To edit your campaign language preferences:

  • Go to the Campaigns tab, click on the campaign you’d like to edit, and choose Settings. You should be in the All settings sub-tab.
  • Scroll down to Languages and click on Edit.
  • Choose applicable languages and click on Save.

How it works…

Google Ads decides where to show ads based on one of the following:

  • Google language setting. Each Google domain has a default (for example, Google.it defaults to Italian), but you can change your language settings via
http://www.google.com/preferences.
  • Language of a user’s search query, or in what language is the user searching on Google.
  • The language of the currently viewed page or recently viewed pages on Google’s Display network. For example, if a person is reading news in Italian, Google Ads will show ads targeted to Italian speakers.

There’s more…

Language targeting is chosen at the campaign level. You may wish to create separate campaigns for different language targets, especially if you are considering using keywords in different languages and have a website that’s translated into multiple languages. For example, you may wish to have the following campaigns:

  • Campaign #1 – English
  • Campaign #2 – Spanish

Creating themed ad groups

An ad group should contain closely related keywords that all speak to a similar theme. Keeping all keywords within a single, tightly themed ad group will allow you to create more targeted ads that will generate a better response, bring more qualified visitors, and improve returns.

Getting ready

To help you get ready, following are some examples of ad groups that follow best practices as well as ad groups that do not.

Poor ad group structure

If an ad group has several keywords, all with different themes, your ads are less likely to be effectively targeted. The following is an example of a poorly themed ad group with only keywords within that ad group loosely related:

Ad Group:

  • Cleaning Service
  • Keywords:
  • Sofa cleaning
  • Carpet cleaning service
  • Stains
  • Drapery cleaning

A good test to double check if your themes are tight enough is to ask yourself if each keyword within your ad group has been reflected in your ad text. Make sure you find a balance between relevant groupings and being too specific. Creating a separate ad group for each individual keyword is likely not the best use of your time!

How to do it…

To create a new ad group within an Google Ads campaign, perform the following steps:

  • Go to the Campaigns tab, and click on the campaign you’d like to create ad groups for.
  • Click on + New ad group.
  • Name your ad group. Choose a name descriptive of the keywords that you will be adding to this ad group.
  • Write a text ad. Your ads should point out what makes your business unique and include some of your keywords, ideally in your headline:
  • Enter your keywords. Start with small, targeted lists of 5 to 10 keywords.
  • Choose a default bid that will apply to this ad group. Refer to Chapter 1, Researching the Market and Competition and Setting Goals, and research competitors to getbid ideas.
  • Click on Save ad group:

How it works…

An ad group is a set of similar keywords and ads with a default bid. Within each campaign, you can have multiple ad groups. Each campaign can house up to 20,000 ad groups.

There’s more…

The following are some common themes to create ad groups around:

  • Different products or services (such as carpet cleaning and furniture cleaning)
  • Different ways to describe the same product or service (such as carpet cleaning and rug cleaning)
  • Multiple locations (such as San Jose carpet cleaning and Santa Clara carpet cleaning)
  • Separate ad groups for each landing page, product, or service
  • Separate ad groups for special offers or holiday promotions

Renaming campaigns and ad groups

After you set up your campaigns and ad groups, you may wish to rename them to better reflect the theme or promotion you are running. You can rename Google Ads campaigns and ad groups at any time.

Getting ready

Plan out your new naming convention. It’s usually helpful to describe the campaign’s theme as well as the network you are targeting.

How to do it…

  • Click on the Campaigns tab, hover next to the campaign or ad group you wish to rename until you see a pencil icon, then click on it.
  • Enter the new name and click on Save.

There’s more…

You may wish to name your campaigns to reflect the products and services you are promoting, which regions they target, or to indicate what networks you are running ads on. For example, you could have a campaign named Printing Supplies – Search – USA. If you decide to rename a campaign, keep in mind that it will start showing as a new campaign in your Google Analytics reports, so try to avoid frequently changing campaign names.

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